Loch Lomond lies within the picturesque landscapes of the Scottish countryside. This iconic destination has been captivating visitors for years with its exuberant woodlands, magnificent mountains and enchanting beauty as the largest Loch by surface area in Great Britain. Our guide will explore the islands of Loch Lomond, their history and how to get there for a day of adventure in the Scottish Countryside.

 

Inchcailloch

Inchcailloch, known as the “Isle of the Old Woman” or “Isle of the Cowled Woman”, offers a glimpse into Scotland's past and those that once lived there through ancient burial grounds. Inchcailloch is one of the largest of the Loch Lomond islands, but it is still small enough that you can explore the whole area on foot, making it the perfect day trip adventure.

The island is easily accessible through the ferry from Balmaha Boatyard to the north pier of Inchcailloch, operating every day between 9am till 5pm during the summer months. Trips are normally every 30 minutes.

At the bottom of the island lies Port Dawn, equipped with a picnic area, toilets and a small camp site. If you wish to make use of the camping site, make sure to book in advance as the park warden is frequently present during the summer period.

 

Inchmurrin

Inchmurrin is the largest of the Loch Lomond islands and the largest inland island in Britain. Its name comes from the chapel of St Mirren which previously stood on Inchmurrin. The island was a popular destination for historic figures including Robert the Bruce and Mary Queen of Scots, but the Scott Family now privately owns and manages it. The island is filled with history including a 7th century monastery and the ruins of Lennox Castle.

You can access the Inchmurrin island by ferry from the burnfoot jetty at Arden. The journey takes 15 minutes and usually operates during the warmer months when the weather enables a smoother, easier journey.

Inchconnachan

Since the 14th century, Inchconnachan has been owned by the Colquhoun Family. A house built in the 18th century was used as a retreat for the family. Inchconnachan has a population of wallabies that were introduced by Lady Arran Colquhoun. The island's beauty is the perfect attraction for nature enthusiasts, filled with woodlands and open spaces, giving travellers a breathtaking walk around the island.

You can get to the island by ferry from Luss. The ferry service normally operates seasonally, so be sure to check the ferry schedules for timings in advance. The ride offers a scenic experience with breathtaking views of Loch Lomond and the surrounding islands, so be ready to capture the beauty along the way.

 

Inchlonaig

Inchlonaig is the most northern of the Loch Lomond islands. The island has evidence of human habitation going as far back as 5000 BC. Inchlonaig is filled with dew trees and is known through history that Robert the Bruce planted the first of these trees to produce the bows for his archers for the Battle of Bannockburn.

To access the island, you can catch the ferry from Balmaha shore. The journey captivates you by Scotland’s natural beauty and provides breathtaking views of the other islands. It's the perfect photo opportunity.

 

Inchtavannach

Inchtavannach is one of the larger islands situated among the Loch Lomond islands. Its name translates to “Monk’s Isle” as it once was a site of a monastery. The island is close to the mainland, being separated by a small Bandry Bay and is one of the most accessible islands within the Loch. Inchtavannach is filled with natural beauty and avian species, making it a haven for birdwatchers.

When looking to get to Inchtavannach, you can embark on a ferry from Balmaha shore. The journey offers a picturesque view of Loch Lomond and its beautiful islands.

Inchfad

Inchfad, also known as “long island”, gets its name from the island's elongated shape, being nearly half a mile in length. The island was previously known to be a place of illegal whiskey distilling, and it is believed the island was the origin of smuggling alcohol for the Glasgow market. Inchfad is the perfect spot for birdwatchers to immerse themselves in the beauty of the flying inhabitants that call the island home.

To access Inchfad, you can jump on a ferry departing from Balmaha on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond. The views are memorable and captivating and will leave you wanting to explore more.

 

Inchmoan

Inchmoan translates to “peat island”, linking to its history of peat harvesting and farming. The island has beautiful sandy beaches, making it a go-to destination for campers and the perfect spot for picnics. The island is closely situated near Inchcruin, separated only by a short stretch of shallow water. The island provides a calm atmosphere that invites you to explore the untouched treasures of its landscapes.

To get to Inchmoan, you can catch a ferry departing from Luss. It is a short journey but offers picturesque views of the surrounding landscape.

 

Inchcruin

The beautiful island of Inchcruin, also known as “the round island”, gets its name from the small round peninsula at the southeastern end of the island. Though the island's shores are rock based, it is filled with enchanting woodlands, stunning landscapes, and lush greenery. It’s the perfect spot to immerse yourself in the quiet of nature.

To get to Inchcruin, you can embark on a ferry from the shores of Luss. The service, usually operated by local providers, ensures a captivating view of Loch Lomonds natural beauty.

 

Cameron House Accommodation

Cameron House is a beautiful five-star resort located in the picturesque Loch Lomond landscape. We offer luxurious rooms and suites, world-renowned hospitality and the perfect sanctuary for exploring the beauty of the Loch Lomond Islands. Take a look at our luxury facilities and the exciting golf and spa opportunities we have to offer.

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